Posts Tagged ‘oproer’

De Kromme Haring

It was quiet in Utrecht City for a while. Sure, the number of commercial breweries kept rising as it did everywhere, but it’s big brother to the north, Amsterdam, overtook Utrecht with some fine new brewing initiatives. But 2016 is the year of the comeback. I have already discussed Duits & Lauret and Oproer in earlier posts who now have their own installations in or near Utrecht. New brewers like NeoBosski are also doing fine right now. The end of summer saw the opening of another brewpub: De Kromme Haring.

logo-v2De Kromme Haring is not a completely new name in Utrecht. Steve and Gijs met over a bottle of Brett IPA called Twisted Kipper and things started rolling after that. Two years ago they made their debut on the Utrecht Beerbrewersfestival. Not unnoticed because their Smokey the Barracuda immediately won the prize for best beer in Utrecht. I also recall having a great sour called Lactic Fantastic.

The names of these three beers should already tell you the types of beer De Kromme Haring makes. Don’t come here for simple dubbels or blondes, more adventurous stuff happens here with a great focus and yeast and fermentation. Beers that cross borders of style, and that is no surprise because De Kromme Haring is an American-Dutch cooperation. Steve and Gijs, you figure out who is from which country.

Kafe België

In Amsterdam ‘t Arendsnest and sister bars Beer Temple and Craft and Draft have spawned some of the best breweries in the city. Oedipus and Pampus for example had their start there. Utrecht has a similar bar in Kafe Belgie and sister store Bert’s Bierhuis. “Graduates” from both now work at illustrious Utrecht beer haunts Maximus, Oproer and De Bierverteller to name a few. Gijs also started here. The better breweries always seem to have a history at another beer places it seems. Goes to show the brewing business is mostly not for complete newcomers.

Steve was born in Massachusetts (yes, he is the American in case you hadn’t figured that out yet) and was working at Utrecht University as a biologist. This background in biology has helped him understand the brewing process better than most, making the second branch on which De Kromme Haring is built another firm one. He took the big step of quitting the university to work at De Kromme Haring full time.

A real place!

During the first years they were gypsy brewers with a dream of their own place. After a very successful crowdfunding campaign they found room at the Vechtclub XL and moved in. De Vechtclub XL is a building that besides De Kromme Haring also houses a restaurant, coffee place, flower store and a bakery. A place that might not look much from the outside, it’s a little built in between other buildings, but once you wander onto the courtyard you will find a lot of cool stuff.

krom1The bar and brewery

The brewing installation has made its way from China and is being set up so that they can brew themselves. Beer flows from 12 taps with taphandles crafted by Steve’s father who does woodworking as a hobby. He also made the bar and tables. For now the first four taps are all Kromme Haring beers. The others from like minded breweries from all over. When I was there I saw some stuff from Cloudwater and Lost Industry. Gijs tries to keep it diverse so that there is something for everyone at all time, also for novices to the beer drinking scene. Last week they had their first Tap Takeover when English brewery Wiper and True came over to tap their wonderful beers in Utrecht.

Utrecht’s Comeback?

With the Kromme Haring Utrecht has another great beer destination and can now boast 3 brewpubs (Oproer and Maximus the other two) in the city and surrounding suburbs. The bars (like DeRat and Drie Dorstige Herten) are still the same and amazing. I have already discussed the growing number of shops for good beer. And with VandeStreek opening a new brewery Utrecht is back and better than ever.

krom2Oh, what’s a Kromme Haring?

The translation of Kromme Haring is Crooked Herring, but there is no deeper meaning to it. Steve needed a name when he went to festivals like Kimchi when he was still homebrewing and just put some words together, influenced mainly by an alley in Utrecht called the Drie Haringensteeg and the Kromme Rijn river. Two of the first experiences Steve had when he arrived in Utrecht. It is now in their logo. Kromme Haring anyone? Then go over to the brewpub.

Kromme Haring Website

 

Brewda 2016

The summer is coming to an end and so does this part of the beer festival season. When Borefts finishes at the end of this month brewers and beer lovers alike will turn their focus to the traditional bock beer season.

But before making the annual pilgrimage to Bodegraven there are other festivals worth a visit. Last weekend’s Brewda in Breda, now in its third year, is one of those.

A new type of festival

Festivals in Holland tended to be small affairs. Most of them organized by PINT, the national association for the promotion of traditional beer. With not as much happening compared to now, what they did was great and important in keeping the craft beer flame alive.

A different beer festival came with the first editions of De Molen’s Borefts festival. For me at least the first time I could come into contact in my own country with similar breweries like De Molen, but from Europe. Breweries that were hard to find. Just like De Molen often went to festivals in other countries.

But it wasn’t only beer drinkers who came into contact with new brewers. Dutch brewers too got to see what else was made in the world, leading to inspiration and great colabs.

This cross-cultural interaction got another boost when a number of Dutch breweries made the trip to the new promised land of beer, Oregon. This as part of the Portland – Utrecht sister cities program, something that has been repeated every year since.

The International Festival

It was only a matter of time before other festivals went international, and it is no wonder that it is the great number of breweries with international, mostly Portland, ties that are organizing them.

20160903_151537Festivals abound now at Van Moll, Kaapse, Oersoep or Oedipus. Last weekend was Breda’s own Frontaal’s turn with their Brewda, held for the third time. For the first time it was organized over two days, with different breweries on each day. We went for the Saturday, it had some of the finest Dutch breweries around these days. It didn’t seem a coincidence that the setup was International brewery next to a Dutch one next to an International one etc.

This was an invitation festival, meaning that the brewers were invited to come. With many festivals you actually sign up and pay for a stand. This means some brewers with a little money to spend and bad beer to serve can stand there as well. Good for exposure, not always great for overall quality. Quality wasn’t a problem here. Apart from the beer which I will get too, other things were taken care off too. Plenty of food stalls outside, they problem of not enough food seems to be over. Free water taps and plenty of room to sit inside as well. Seating was also a problem at many festivals, but organizers are taking care of that as well. Of course this was a festival with online presale, something that was special just two years ago but is now. Now to the beer!

Mojito So20160903_154131ur anyone?

The breweries from abroad came from the U.K., Spain and the U.S.A. It is always great to see Weird Beard bring their awesome beers. Their double coffee milk stout was wonderful.  A new one for me was Oregon’s own Caldera, a brewery I had heard much about but had never had the privilege to taste before. Let’s just say I hope this wasn’t the last time.

A brewery that brought the strangest beers was Sheffield’s Lost Industry. Sour beers with daquiri, pina colada but their best one was a mojito. Just the right sourness for a sour beer and it works great in tandem with a mojito. Definitely worth checking out more so Dutch beer stores, get crackin’.

The Dutch breweries

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Walhalla’s Aart van Bergen at work

When breweries are invited you know that they will be good. On Saturday big ones like Frontaal, Oedipus, ‘t Uiltje and Oproer poured their beers. Walhalla was also invited. And deservedly so. Since brewer Aart has been making his beers for about a year now the reviews have been great. Having had all of his beers now I am rapidly becoming a fan. For example,  I waited with trying his golden ale, the Loki, because it is not a style I usually try right away. I should have done earlier, this hopped up beer was great. He also brought a colab with Kromme Haring so you know what company he keeps. I cannot wait to try more.

And the others? Well, Oproer brought along an old geuze from Rooie Dop days. A two year old sour that cleared the sinuses. Too bad nothing of that is made anymore. ‘t Uiltje brought mostly beers that are easier to find, just like Oedipus did. But these two have become giants seemingly overnight. A festival without them that aims for quality is simply not complete without them. Frontaal is brewery that is relatively new to me because it isn’t always easy to find for me where I get my bottles usually. I recently read they are scaling up as well. What I did have so far was good. Experimental stuff and regular beers Frontaal does it all, and often in collaboration with other good breweries like for example Oproer. I really hope they make it to more stores so I can try more.

The International Festival, what a feast

I am not advocating the end of the Dutch brewery only festivals, anything but. Their merit has increased with the current rise of brewing. They need a place to showcase their beers and gain the experience needed to take further steps. It is only a great thing that next to these we have international festivals like these. It can only making the state of brewing in this country better.

 

From Mill to Factory. Utrechts Beerbrewersfestival 2016

In a move that was bound to happen, the successful Utrecht Beerbrewersfestival moved from its old spot in downtown Utrecht to a larger location. Like the industrial age in the 19th century the windmill is now replaced by a factory. A former factory that is now an entertainment complex called De Fabrique.

The move was inevitable. The former location was great, close to the railway station yet rustic. But the number of breweries kept growing, and so did the stream of beer lovers making their way to the windmill. Last year they sold out their glasses long before the festival was finished, leaving many disappointed.

I was somewhat afraid when I heard this was their new location. Factory buildings conjure up images of concrete slabs of drabness. It was also 1,5 km (about a mile) away from the nearest railway station.

Boy was I wrong.

_DSC0896The setup was great. Some brewers had outside stalls, the rest was placed inside. There was room to sit inside or outside, a problem at the previous location. Though concrete the building has a retro feel to it, like they never really tried to make it into one perfect space, but rather a collection of previous additions. Old beams on the ceiling, defunct electricity units were still there. Useless, but it did add a certain warmth.

The number of breweries present this year was 27. But were all these new breweries also better in quality? Well, unfortunately new breweries tend to come out with beers that are anything but renewing, too many blondes and tripels. The market is already swamped with these and it doesn’t offer anything new. There is nothing wrong with his per sé, but I tend to try to more unusual styles. As I have noticed before the cream of the crop is getting better, the gap with the rest seems to be widening. Duits & Lauret and VandeStreek were conveniently placed outside, but it is no surprise that they had long lines. Rock City from Amersfoort is improving every year and they brought some nice barrel aged beers along with many other styles.

New breweries, no old styles

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Neobosski

If you really want to stand out as new brewery, come up with something new. A new brewery for me, and one I appreciated, was Neobossky. They have one beer, a Black IPA type with inspirated by Duits & Lauret and Emelisse. Could be worse right?

So tell me, are porters making a comeback? I had quite a few good ones in Utrecht. Oproer had a porter called Leftöver, made of you guessed it, leftovers. It’s typical that their beer made from what was laying around was better to drink than other beers. SpierBier from Mijdrecht brought a Baltic porter aged in red port barrels. One of the highlights for me and apparently also for others because they made the top 5 of most coins sold. There were other barrel aged projects that were worth trying from VandeStreek and Rock City. I didn’t even get the StapZwan porter I had last year that was amazing, and a good example of a new brewery starting with something slightly different.

Or come up with something old. De Dikke won the Most Appreciated Beer of Utrecht award with a Kuyt beer, a nice historic beerstyle that needs to be made more. It wasn’t the best beer in my view, but having the balls to make this earns a lot of bonus points. Congratulations.

Other improvements

So the new space is better. Apart from more room the food has improved too with great hotdogs and fried chicken. People walked around with Belgian fries too, a lovely touch. A pop-up Mitra store sold bottles from breweries present at the festival so you could take with you what you weren’t able to taste.

Blueprint for the future

If it is at all possible to stay at this location the festival has room to grow. I had a feeling the turnout was little less than previous years, but that could just be because they were spread out more. There now is room for even more brewers and visitors, and they only used a quarter of the available space. I will be back, I hope you will too.

P.S.

Oh, remember how I told you that I was worried about the distance from nearest railway station (Maarssen) to the festival? Not a problem, if you didn’t want to walk or weren’t able to, a shuttle brought people to and fro all day during the festival.

Oproer, a brewery insurgent

An hour before leaving for Oproer I get a message from Mark. He has something to do before meeting me in his new brewery and might run late. When I walk in 15 minutes after the doors opened he indeed isn’t there. Other people are getting ready for a new day at their new workplace.

Twenty minutes later Mark walks in, carrying a new oven for the kitchen. It’s a new role for him, no longer is he the sole owner of Rooie Dop, but one of four guys running their new venture they named Oproer. A new place means new responsibilities, especially because they oproer1do everything themselves. The beer is brewed and bottled here and 5 meters from the brewery it will be served in the brewpub. Everything Oproer does will be under one roof in a non-distinct building in Utrecht that also houses storage units. And that new oven? That will be used in the vegan kitchen that is part of Oproer as well.

It is a new and exciting time for all them, but how did we end up meeting here? Let’s travel back in time.

Beginnings

Oproer is the combined effort of now former Utrecht breweries Rooie Dop and Ruig together with experienced people from beerretail and the restaurant/bar business. Of the breweries Rooie Dop was the most known and has been featured on this blog more than once. Mark Strooker started out with two friends brewing Rooie Dop beer but after a while was the only one who remained. Rooie Dop was a contract brewery that brewed at De Molen and made American inspired beers. The beer itself was loved by many but he also added a new chapter to the book of Dutch beer history by helping to bring over ten Dutch breweries to the Oregon Brewers Festival in Portland, Oregon, still the biggest showcase of Dutch craft beer abroad.

But brewing at De Molen ended and Mark was now left to find something else to be able to continue Rooie Dop. He teamed up with smaller Utrecht brewery Ruig and since late 2015 they morphed into Oproer.

Oproer

Oproer is a continuation of the best of both breweries. They are an off-kilter, against the grain type of brewery. Not because their businessplan says so, but because that is who they are. Googling for the translation of Oproer gives you several suggestions: insurrection, revolt, rebellion, and mutiny being the best. The Oproer team’s sympathies can be found on the left side of the political spectrum. A group that has more in common with the squatters community of the late 1980s and 1990s. When I walked in the Pixies were playing, and I doubt there was a Michael Bublé CD in sight. One of the beers on tap was called IPA Über Alles. If you think this is a reference to the pre-war German national anthem think again and ask the music geek next to you what is meant and he will not hesitate to mention the Dead Kennedys.

oproer2Oproer has a similar punk ideology in that it is a do-it-yourself enterprise. No outside funding as of yet, and with stuff from all over. The furniture is from another brewery and they found the couch somewhere else. The brewing equipment s divided from the rest of the room by a guardrail of a highway. Why spend hundreds of Euros when you can just as easily find it second hand that does the same job just as well.

 

Beer and Food

oproer3The foundation of Oproer is, and will be the beer. Too often we see a brewpub start with good food but beer that is still a work-in-progress towards something worth going out of your way for. At Oproer it is the brewpub that is a work-in-progress but has the beer to rival any brewer in the country. We knew the beer was great and with some tweaking the former Rooie Dop and Ruig beers are still classy.

A big cooler will be placed in the back where the beer will be served from around 20 taps. Not only their own Oproer beer but also collabs and space for friendly brewers. Rooie Dop has been brewing with breweries at home and abroad: Brew by Numbers, Buxton, Hair of the Dog, Cascade and Ilkley to name just. These connections, together with friendships made at the Portland Brewing festival means a big chance of finding good guest beers on tap at Oproer. It will become one of those places where even the most avid beer hunter will find things for the first time. Oproer will be the first brewery in the country to fill only 66cl bottles and not the standard 33. Bigger, sure, but more good stuff in one glass container.

But it is not only beer. A wide range of sodas, local wine and local spirits can be found as well. The tea and coffee are all green and not by any major food producer. It has always bugged me that some restaurants take pride in having local and pure ingredients while at the same time serving Coca Cola and Heineken. Don’t worry, you won’t find that here.

Toys and children seats are being collected. Oproer has to be a place for the entire family and the food and drinks match that plan.

Food, or why beer shouldn’t automatically be paired with meat

oproer4The menu at Oproer is vegan. This wasn’t a fundamental/ideological choice. Three quarters of team Oproer are vegetarian so for them it is easier. Bart-Jan, the other brewer and formerly of Ruig, does believe that the idea of automatically pairing beer with meat makes no sense. Sure, it can be great but the level of vegetarian cuisine has risen. The chef has made a limited, but diverse menu that keeps changing. The pumpkin soup I tried was wonderful. Hopefully it will show a part of the beer drinking culture that vegan food can be great.

A new jewel

Oproer has all the ingredients to become yet another new world class beer destination in the Netherlands. Not only is it superbly located next to railway station Utrecht Zuilen, and therefore easy to reach from both Amsterdam and Utrecht, it is run by people who know their way around beer and have the track record to show for it. But it is more than beer alone and that is the way to go in this particular time. Utrecht has gotten competition from other cities lately but this a big step in maintaining Utrecht’s position as one of, if not the, best city to go for beer.

The website is here.

2016, a promising year

Happy New Year

Hello you lover of craft beer, you fan of Dutch beer. 2015 is already two weeks behind us, and 2016 promises to be another good, if not better, year for beer. I will again write about this beautiful product, as much as time and finances will let me.

Because dear reader, I am glad to see that you keep visiting my blog. Last week it reached 50,000 views, 49,999 more views than I ever expected. And because of it I have seen, and became part of, a growing culture in this country. Because of it I know more people. Because of the festivals and breweries we have seen cities and parts of the country that I had never been to before. I have been to bars and shops I otherwise would have passed by. This revolution doesn’t just lead to having more different beers, but has given me so much.

So what will I write about on these pages this year? There is much to look forward to. New breweries, new bars, old breweries in a new form and a city that will be a premier beer destination in 2016.

The Next Step

Most of the brewers I interviewed share a similar history. They start brewing at home, and when it is not just them that seems to like it, they approach a brewery where they can make bigger batches. Contract brewing is still how many brewers operate, especially the smaller ones who just started and who are still doing this as a side hobby/business. Some of these brewers who started out like this at the beginning of the Dutch Craft Beer Revolution about 5 years ago are moving into new territory this year.

20151109_123318I have already blogged about Duits & Lauret and their move into an actual fortress this year. This is the most prestigious project in beer so far and I will be writing more about it when it opens. Another veteran that deserves a mention is Ruud van Moorst of Eem, who finally will get his own brewery. A well-deserved spot for someone who has given the Dutch brewing world so much already

logo-oproer-brouwerij-light-on-dark-250pxOproer!

The first major event on the calendar is the opening of Oproer! The name is new, the people behind it certainly not. Oproer! is the combining of forces of Utrecht breweries Ruig en Rooie Dop. Mark Strooker of Rooie Dop has already been doing great things for Dutch brewing in the last 5 years. Not only was Rooie Dop one of the better known breweries abroad, he also organized the Dutch delegation to the Oregon Brewers festival two years ago, which led to a slew of collaboration beers and the confidence that what was happening here in Holland meant something.

Oproer! Will be a brewpub. The brewing will take place here and besides the beer you can have a vegan/vegetarian meal. It will be another boost for Utrecht, already one of the best places to go for craft beer. The opening is today and since it is close to where I live it will be one of the first things I will be writing about on the blog.

Also in Utrecht, VandeStreek is working on their own brewery and pub. We will of course report about that to when the time comes.

Amsterdam

The number of brewers in Amsterdam is still growing, with most of them still contract brewers. Writing about Oedipus has been in the pipeline for two years now and hopefully this year I will finally get around to visiting their place and write about this unique brewery. And then there’s Gebrouwen Door Vrouwen (Brewed by Women), two enthusiastic brewing sisters that deserve a post. Another post will be about Aart van bergen, formerly of Vriendschap, who has decided to start brewing on his own brewery.

The city itself will feature in several posts. The western part of the city has seen new bars and shops pop up and is worth a day trip on its own. Another tour is along the almost finished North-South subway line. On this street there are great old and new bars and breweries like Troost.

Other cities

While the Amsterdam-Utrecht area is still the axis of Dutch brewing the other cities are following in their footsteps. Rotterdam with Kaapse and The Hague with Kompaan have already shown to be good beer cities. Three other cities are also gaining ground. In Nijmegen several breweries make excellent beers like the superb Oersoep. The number of great bars here is high as well. Hopefully soon we will get a chance to visit the city for a weekend and write about it. Another city on the list is Eindhoven with Van Moll and a new city brewery. Good things are happening in Haarlem too. ‘t Uiltje is hard at work financing their own brewery. Once this is done the ties with Jopen can be cut and they can do everything themselves.

groningenbierbord

The Blackboard with only beers from Groningen at De Koffer

Groningen

But if there is one city that will be our focus this year it will be Groningen. It has for decades been a perfect place for specialty beer cafés, but has been bereft of quality breweries. The city got a big boost with the annual two day festival in the main church and when Bax Bier started selling its beer. After having their first two beers it was immediately clear that Jeroen and Sepp from Bax made beer that was miles ahead of the other breweries in the north. And I wasn’t the only one who spotted this. Their success has led to their own brewery/tasting room/restaurant which will open in Groningen this year. It will be one of the biggest buildings in the country. But Bax isn’t the only brewery that is active in the city. Late last year Martinus started in a beautiful old building in downtown Groningen. They started off with a new brewing installation and restaurant. I haven’t been there yet but will soon. City Brewery het Kromme Jat has been brewing for a years now but is not alone anymore. The Groninger Craft Brewery has been around for a year now with some success and last year also saw the start of brewers like Corviri, Rockin’ Ludina, Pivo and Jotner. In the provincial city of Wildervank, Jan Abbingh has been producing some decent beers already. The number of establishments where you can find this beer is growing as well, with its crown jewel Mout (we wrote about the crowdfunding campaign last year) scheduled to open in 2016 on the edge of the old city. So stay tuned follow this blog for more about the Groningen beer scene.

Leftovers, labels and geeks

I will be posting more articles about other things. I got a question from a read last year who wanted to know what all the symbols on the labels of his bottles of Dutch beer meant. This will be a two part article. One a translation guide to the labels, the other about the at times mystifying laws about what and what not print on a label.

In the coming weeks I will post something about the amazing facebook group BeerGeeks, a group of beerlovers who have shown that a love of beer unites people. And it is a union that encompasses more than just beer.

The page

The page will see some minor changes this year, I will keep updating the calendar and the map. I will also add a page with all the prizewinning Dutch craft beers.

2016 is going to be a great year for beer and I hope to meet some of you somewhere in this great country in a beautiful bar or at the festival.

 

See you then. Proost.