Archive for February, 2016

Translating the Dutch Beer Label

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Label of ‘t Uiltje’s “Met Je Cascade Groene Trui”. Taken from Harry Pinkster’s Website

This blog owes much of its existence of me translating websites and beer labels for American friends. So why not start a blog about Dutch beer but in English I thought!

In five years information has become better and sites are now often in both Dutch and English and in some cases only in English even. I got an e-mail last year that made me decide to write this article. A gentleman from abroad now living in Haarlem wanted to know what Cat II and Cat III meant on the labels of the beer bottles he had at home. So I grabbed my beer label collection (yes, I have one too), looked at them and here it is: a description and translation of Dutch Beer Labels, Part I. Part II will be about what the government dictates should be on them.

Basic vocabulary

If you have heard or read any Dutch at all you will notice that with a good grasp of English you can translate most of the words. If for some reason you also have knowledge of German this will be even easier. The Dutch language is like on the map, stuck between English and German. This also explains why tourists coming here have a hard time finding anyone who doesn’t speak English. We are not known as a people that give foreign words Dutch translations. Computer, Manager, Smartphone all mean the same. In beer lingo it isn’t any different. Stouts, porters, IPA’s, DIPA’s, Saisons, Russian Stouts are the same here as they are in most of the brewing world.

But here are some of the words you will almost always find on a label, with the translation.

Bier = beer. Surprising isn’t it?

Brouwerij = brewery. See the resemblance now?

Ten Minste Houdbaar Tot literally translates as ‘at least preservable until’. It is the best before date.

Another pointer for storing the bottle is ‘koel en donker bewaren’, keep cool and dark.

Statiegeld = bottle refund. Most bottles now can be thrown in the glasbak (glass container found often near supermarkets), certain types of bottle still offer a ten cent refund and in rare cases 25. The bigger craft breweries like Jopen, Uiltje, De Molen and Emelisse use non-refundable bottles. If you live here, take all your bottles to the supermarket and try feeding them to the bottle return machine. Even labels that say there is no statiegeld might give you a return of 10 cents. After a while you will figure out what works and what doesn’t.

Bier van hoge gisting = is a beer with top fermentation. If the description is lage instead of hoge it means the opposite.

Kan gluten bevatten = May contain gluten.

Inhoud

Beer in Holland is mostly bottled in 33cl bottles. That’s little over 11 oz for you on the other side of the ocean. Occasionally you will find larger ones like 50cl and 75cl. Some of the more commercial bigger breweries may have smaller bottles of 25cl. The size will be translated as ‘inhoud’.

Good labels will have IBU (bitterness) and EBC (color), the same as in most countries these days. More about this in Part 2.

Cat I, Cat II, III and Cat S

Now this was the main reason for the e-mail. What does this actually mean? This is a purely Dutch categorization and done for taxation purposes. Taxes are paid according to the height of the Plato, but the actual Plato cannot be mentioned on the label. Why is a different story and will be talked about in the follow-up to this article. The four categories are:

  • III = Plato 1-7
  • II = 7-11
  • I = 11-15.5
  • S = 15.5 and upwards

Ingredients

It is here that the words start to become a different. Water and hop are Water and hops. The grains used are different.

Gerst = barley

Tarwe = wheat

Rogge = rye

Boekweit = buckwheat

Mais = corn

Spelt and Emmer are the same.

Mout = malt. A good brewer will mention the specific malt or malts used, but these are almost always directly taken from the country of origin. Same goes for the hops by the way, no complicated Dutch translations of Saaz or Cascade. Only pilsmout is Dutch as far as I have seen, but it won’t take a 160+ IQ to translate that.

Suiker = sugar. Rietsuiker = canesugar and kristalsuiker = crystallized or granulated sugar

Yeast may be the hardest beer word to pronounce in Dutch and it is gist. It is pronounced like ‘jist’ if that was a Spanish word.

Other ingredients:

Other ingredients I have come across:

Zeewier = seaweed

Zoethout = liquirice root

Sinaasappel = orange

Geroosterd = roasted

Jeneverbes = juniperberry

Korianderzaad = coriander / cilantroseed

Kruiden = herbs

Specerijen = spices

Citroengras = lemongrass

Honing = honey

There are of course more ingredients that are used in certain beers. If you want a translation let me know, or check google translate.

 

Thank you all for 100 posts.

And so we arrive at another milestone: 100 blogposts. 100 times that I, sometimes with help of others, have posted about the still growing Dutch beer scene. A small scene when I started 6 years ago, bigger now with the end not yet in sight. A great scene, a great culture of people who all share a love for well-made craft beer.

This century of posts was a big tribute to all of you.

The readers, the fans.

Wow, people actually read my blog! A thank you to you all more than appropriate. You the reader are the ones who want to know more about what is going on with beer in the Netherlands. It is because of you that more and more beer is made. So thank you!

The shops and cafés

Thank you beershop owners and specialty beer café managers. Thanks to you the public has had more choice than ever. Thanks also for those who have welcomed me in their place of business and have taken the time to talk to me and answer my questions. It was very insightful.

Festivals

Thank you festival organizers. I see a growing number of people at a growing number of festivals. Festivals now so big they have to move to new spaces to accommodate all the visitors. If you organized crappy festivals this wouldn’t happen. A great way to try new beer and for brewers to showcase their beer to a large audience. A great way for beginners to understand there is more than Heineken and for those from outside the country to show what great things are made here.

The sidemen and women

This thank you is for the special people who operate within the scene without actually making or selling it. The collectors, the teachers, the graphic artists, the tourguides, the historians that make beer into a bigger cultural phenomenon. You add the dimension that makes beer more fun.

The brewers

The biggest thank you is for you: the brewers. Without you none of this would have been possible. You make that one thing that all of us love: great craft beer.

Many of you have taken the time to answer any questions I had. What I have concluded is that the best brewers also give the best and most encompassing answers. The great brewers have a lot of enthusiasm and it take their time to convey this. It hasn’t always been possible to go wherever I wanted to ask you things because of work, family and location. Your e-mailed answers have been insightful and helpful. It is no wonder that the best articles were after I e-mailed the likes of Duits & Lauret, Rooie Dop (now Oproer), Bax, ‘t Uiltje and Oersoep. And I forgetting others for sure. There were many more but their answers and subsequent articles showed they are going in the right direction. When I interviewed them they were still start-ups, now they all have great ideas and a bright future ahead. You are the front runners, the examples for others, the ones leading the way for the next generation of brewers.

So thank all of you, it has been a blast. I hope you have all enjoyed what I wanted to write about. It was never my mission to make this into a blog with just opinions but to actually tell you something new about what is going on in this country.

I am ready for the next 100 posts, I hope you are too.

 

Oproer, a brewery insurgent

An hour before leaving for Oproer I get a message from Mark. He has something to do before meeting me in his new brewery and might run late. When I walk in 15 minutes after the doors opened he indeed isn’t there. Other people are getting ready for a new day at their new workplace.

Twenty minutes later Mark walks in, carrying a new oven for the kitchen. It’s a new role for him, no longer is he the sole owner of Rooie Dop, but one of four guys running their new venture they named Oproer. A new place means new responsibilities, especially because they oproer1do everything themselves. The beer is brewed and bottled here and 5 meters from the brewery it will be served in the brewpub. Everything Oproer does will be under one roof in a non-distinct building in Utrecht that also houses storage units. And that new oven? That will be used in the vegan kitchen that is part of Oproer as well.

It is a new and exciting time for all them, but how did we end up meeting here? Let’s travel back in time.

Beginnings

Oproer is the combined effort of now former Utrecht breweries Rooie Dop and Ruig together with experienced people from beerretail and the restaurant/bar business. Of the breweries Rooie Dop was the most known and has been featured on this blog more than once. Mark Strooker started out with two friends brewing Rooie Dop beer but after a while was the only one who remained. Rooie Dop was a contract brewery that brewed at De Molen and made American inspired beers. The beer itself was loved by many but he also added a new chapter to the book of Dutch beer history by helping to bring over ten Dutch breweries to the Oregon Brewers Festival in Portland, Oregon, still the biggest showcase of Dutch craft beer abroad.

But brewing at De Molen ended and Mark was now left to find something else to be able to continue Rooie Dop. He teamed up with smaller Utrecht brewery Ruig and since late 2015 they morphed into Oproer.

Oproer

Oproer is a continuation of the best of both breweries. They are an off-kilter, against the grain type of brewery. Not because their businessplan says so, but because that is who they are. Googling for the translation of Oproer gives you several suggestions: insurrection, revolt, rebellion, and mutiny being the best. The Oproer team’s sympathies can be found on the left side of the political spectrum. A group that has more in common with the squatters community of the late 1980s and 1990s. When I walked in the Pixies were playing, and I doubt there was a Michael Bublé CD in sight. One of the beers on tap was called IPA Über Alles. If you think this is a reference to the pre-war German national anthem think again and ask the music geek next to you what is meant and he will not hesitate to mention the Dead Kennedys.

oproer2Oproer has a similar punk ideology in that it is a do-it-yourself enterprise. No outside funding as of yet, and with stuff from all over. The furniture is from another brewery and they found the couch somewhere else. The brewing equipment s divided from the rest of the room by a guardrail of a highway. Why spend hundreds of Euros when you can just as easily find it second hand that does the same job just as well.

 

Beer and Food

oproer3The foundation of Oproer is, and will be the beer. Too often we see a brewpub start with good food but beer that is still a work-in-progress towards something worth going out of your way for. At Oproer it is the brewpub that is a work-in-progress but has the beer to rival any brewer in the country. We knew the beer was great and with some tweaking the former Rooie Dop and Ruig beers are still classy.

A big cooler will be placed in the back where the beer will be served from around 20 taps. Not only their own Oproer beer but also collabs and space for friendly brewers. Rooie Dop has been brewing with breweries at home and abroad: Brew by Numbers, Buxton, Hair of the Dog, Cascade and Ilkley to name just. These connections, together with friendships made at the Portland Brewing festival means a big chance of finding good guest beers on tap at Oproer. It will become one of those places where even the most avid beer hunter will find things for the first time. Oproer will be the first brewery in the country to fill only 66cl bottles and not the standard 33. Bigger, sure, but more good stuff in one glass container.

But it is not only beer. A wide range of sodas, local wine and local spirits can be found as well. The tea and coffee are all green and not by any major food producer. It has always bugged me that some restaurants take pride in having local and pure ingredients while at the same time serving Coca Cola and Heineken. Don’t worry, you won’t find that here.

Toys and children seats are being collected. Oproer has to be a place for the entire family and the food and drinks match that plan.

Food, or why beer shouldn’t automatically be paired with meat

oproer4The menu at Oproer is vegan. This wasn’t a fundamental/ideological choice. Three quarters of team Oproer are vegetarian so for them it is easier. Bart-Jan, the other brewer and formerly of Ruig, does believe that the idea of automatically pairing beer with meat makes no sense. Sure, it can be great but the level of vegetarian cuisine has risen. The chef has made a limited, but diverse menu that keeps changing. The pumpkin soup I tried was wonderful. Hopefully it will show a part of the beer drinking culture that vegan food can be great.

A new jewel

Oproer has all the ingredients to become yet another new world class beer destination in the Netherlands. Not only is it superbly located next to railway station Utrecht Zuilen, and therefore easy to reach from both Amsterdam and Utrecht, it is run by people who know their way around beer and have the track record to show for it. But it is more than beer alone and that is the way to go in this particular time. Utrecht has gotten competition from other cities lately but this a big step in maintaining Utrecht’s position as one of, if not the, best city to go for beer.

The website is here.